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Grace for the Injured Self:

The Healing Approach of Heinz Kohut

By Terry D. Cooper and Robert L. Randall

Grace for the Injured Self

Grace for the Injured Self:

The Healing Approach of Heinz Kohut

By Terry D. Cooper and Robert L. Randall

A study of Kohut's 'self psychology' in treating psychological injuries that threaten self-cohesion, and the value of such an approach in pastoral care.

Trade Information: LPOD
Available as: Paperback, PDF

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Print Paperback

ISBN: 9780718892586

Specifications: 229x153mm, 178pp

Published: July 2012

£18.25

PDF eBook

ISBN: 9780718840815

Specifications: 176pp

Published: September 2012

£14.75 + VAT

Grace for the Injured Self shows the reader how the 'self psychology' developed by Heinz Kohut can be an influential theory for pastoral care. The late Kohut affirmed that religion is not only an expression of the self, but can also sustain the self in the alliance between faith and grace, with self psychology and empathy.

Cooper and Randall articulately explore Kohut's psychoanalytic perspective of 'self psychology', orientated towards pastoral care for parishioners. The authors ascertain how the human condition is affected by 'self injury', and the relationship between this and the traditional notions of sin. Two interviews with Kohut, never before published in the UK, give the reader unique insights into the psychoanalyst who many regard as the most important figure in psychology since Sigmund Freud.

Acknowledgments
Greetings to Our Readers

1. The Self Psychology Perspective
2. Self Injury and the Human Condition
3. Kohut and the Seven Deadly Sins
4. A New Pastoral Care Orientation for Parishioners
5. Pastoral Care of the Church as a Group Self
6. First Interview with Heinz Kohut
7. Second Interview with Heinz Kohut
8. Getting Something from Kohut's Perspective on Religion

Closing Words for Our Readers
Bibliography

Terry D. Cooper, EdD, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at St. Louis Community College at Meramec, and Adjunct Professor of Religious Studies at Webster University. He has authored or co-authored eleven books.

Robert L. Randall, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and an ordained minister of the United Church of Christ, now in private practice. He is the author of seven books and numerous articles.

Grace for the Injured Self is a clear, readable, and down-to-earth introduction to the self psychology of Heinz Kohut. It demonstrates the practical relevance of Kohut's central ideas for understanding ourselves and our relations with others. It explains how mutual expressions and acts of empathy enable our lives to reflect more fully the essence of the human spirit. It also shows how attention to the conflicting self-issues of the pastor and congregation may produce fundamentally positive changes in their life together. Personal interviews with Heinz Kohut on religion and the courageous life are an added bonus. A gracefully written book by two thoughtful and perceptive self psychologists. Donald Capps, Professor of Pastoral Psychology, Emeritus, Princeton Theological Seminary
I recommend the book to readers concerned with the interaction of psychology, Christian communities, and faith that reaches out of the pain of Gethsemane ... Tracy E. Martin, in Theological Book Review, Vol 24, No 2
... plenty to think through as we grapple with both the ideal and everyday reality. Dr Anne Spalding, in Church Times, 15 March 2013
Cooper and Randall are to be commended for simplifying complex concepts such that they are comprehensible and broadly useful. The lines they draw between a self-psychological understanding of human suffering and the causes of human sin are thought-provoking and more importantly foster empathy ... Shelley L. Dennis, Drew University, in Reviews in Religion and Theology, Vol 20, No 3
This is a book for those engaged in pastoral care, as well as those in the field of psychology, and, in fact, for all denominational leaders and teachers who try to be channels of healing grace, as well as for those injured ministers of grace themselves. Rosalind Smith, in The Christian Parapsychologist, Vol 1, No 9