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The Incomers

By Sally Robey

The Incomers

The Incomers

By Sally Robey

A fast-paced sequel to 'Tyso's Promise', telling how Muswell meets the dark-haired Romany girl, Rosie, and of the problems caused by the arrival of a motorcycle gang.

Trade Information: LGEN
Available as: Paperback

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Muswell Perkins is bored. Life is too ordinary, with nothing to do but meet his friends in the cafe or to go swimming under the bridge. Two events change things. First he meets Rosie and her strange brother, who have parked their caravan near the quiet Fenland town. The second event is the arrival of a motorcycle gang who set up camp down by the river and receive late night visitors. Rosie is determined to find out exactly what is going on and enlists Muswell's help. Events move faster than they anticipate, and Muswell and his friends are suddenly in great danger.

Sally Robey's sequel to Tyso's Promise centres on a young Jamaican boy (his origins don't become apparent until late in the story) and a travelling Romany girl. Rosie and her brother Tyso are travellers, misunderstood and mistrusted by many people. The story serves to highlight the theme of people who do not fit the 'accepted norm'. The hostility of the motorcycle gang suddenly makes Muswell sharply aware for the first time of his Jamaican parentage and the efforts of his father to make him conform to what he sees as 'proper' behaviour. The author combines a dramatic story with keen observations of the uncertainties felt by many teenagers.

Sally Robey was formerly Head of English at Cambridge College of Further Education, before giving up her job to concentrate on, among other things, her writing. She has spent a great deal of time meeting and talking to real travelling people throughout East Anglia and has ensured that her books accurately reflect their way of life. Her experience as a teacher enables her to write with clear insight into the problems and pressures of adolescence. This is her second novel.